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FAQ’s: 10 Days of Dhu’l-Hijjah [part 1]

Q1: Is it true that the first 10 days of Dhu’l-Hijjah are the best days of the year?

This is likely to be true. In fact there is an explicit Prophetic tradition narrated by Jabir ibn Abdullah (raḍiy Allāhu ʿanhu) in which the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said, “The best days of this world are the ten days (meaning the ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah).” The hadith was reported by al-Bazzar and many traditionalists considered it authentic. There are also a number of other Prophetic traditions that confirm that these ten days are the best days of the year.
Ibn ‘Abbaas (raḍiy Allāhu ʿanhuma) reported that the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said, “There are no days in which righteous deeds are more beloved to Allah than these ten days.” The people asked, “Not even jihad for the sake of Allah?” He said, “Not even jihad for the sake of Allah, except in the case of a man who went out to fight giving himself and his wealth up for the cause, and came back with nothing.”[1]

Ibn Umar (raḍiy Allāhu ʿanhuma) narrated that the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said, “There are no days that the good deeds are beloved and preferable to Allah than the first ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah, so increase and double your tahleel and takbeer and tahmeed.”[2]

The last day among those ten days is the day of nahr (slaughter), or the great hajj. It is also the second and biggest Eid of Islam.
Ibn al-Qayyim (may Allah have mercy on him) wrote, ‘The best of days before Allah is the Day of Slaughtering, which is the greatest day of Hajj as is recorded in Sunan Abi Dawood where it is narrated that the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said, “The greatest of days before Allah is the Day of Slaughtering.”’[3]

However, it was narrated that Friday is the best and the master of the days. “It is greater in the sight of Allah than the day of Ad’ha, sacrifice (slaughtering), and the day of Eid al-Fitr. It includes five merits…” In an attempt to explain this apparent contradiction, Ibn Taymiyyah said “the Best day of the week is Friday unanimously, followed by the day of sacrifice (slaughtering) –according to the correct opinion which is the opinion of Imam Malik, al-Shafi, and Ahmad. It included number of deeds that can’t be done in any other day.” This also means that the following best day is the day of Arafat as some scholars consider it better than the day of sacrifice (slaughtering).
It was also narrated that Ibn ‘Umar (raḍiy Allāhu ʿanhuma) said, “The Prophet (Sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) stood between the Jamaraat on the Day of Sacrifice during his Hajj and said, “This is the day of the greatest Hajj.””[4] In another narration the Prophet said, “The greatest day in the sight of Allah the Almighty is the Day of Nahr and then the Day of Qarr (the 11th day of Dhu’l-Hijjah).”
Based on this, the Day of Nahr is better than Eid al-Fitr because it includes prayer and slaughtering sacrificial animals which are better than prayer and charity. It is on the Day of Arafah that Allah ransoms from the Hellfire those who stood at Arafah as well as those Muslims who did not. Hence the day that follows it is a festival for all Muslims all over the world, of those who attended Hajj and those who did not. Hence the tenth day of Dhu’l-Hijjah is the best of days before Allah, the day of greatest Hajj and the best of Islam’s Eids.

Q2: Are they better than the last ten days of Ramadan?
Abu Uthman al-Nahdi, one of the great scholars of the second generation said, “They used to glorify three groups of ten days; the last ten days of Ramadan, the first ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah and the first ten days of Muharram.” The same question was forwarded to Ibn Taymiyyah and his answer was, “the last ten nights of Ramadan are better in terms of the night and the first ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah are better in terms of the days. Ibn al-Qayyim confirmed this and added that the last ten nights of Ramadan includes the best night, Laylat al-Qadr (the Night of Power), which is better than a thousand months. The great exegete Ibn Kathir accepted this conclusion as well as bringing together seemingly contradictory reports.
It is reported that once the Ten Days started, Sa’eed bin Jubair, the famous scholar of the second generation would exert himself in excessive worship of Allah.

Q3: What good deeds should we do in these ten days?
Generally speaking any act that Allah is pleased with should be done in these days. The primary act to be done abundantly is the tahleeltakbeer and tahmeed as these were the first to be mentioned in the narration of Ibn ‘Umar (raḍiy Allāhu ʿanhuma) where the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said,

“There are no days that are greater before Allah or in which good deeds are more beloved to Him, than these ten days, so recite a great deal of tahleel (saying Laa ilaaha ill-Allah), takbeer (saying Allahu akbar) and tahmeed (saying al-hamdu Lillah) during them.”[5]

These words should be recited loudly, openly, and may be also said silently. Persons in positions of authority should encourage people to practice this forgotten sunnah. Even in Muslim societies it is hardly heard – it should be recited out loudly in order to revive the sunnah and encourage others to act upon it as well. It was authentically narrated that Ibn ‘Umar and Abu Hurayrah (raḍiy Allāhu ʿanhum) used to go out to the marketplace during the first ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah, saying the takbeer loudly, and accordingly the people would remember to do so and say it loudly as well. It should be noted that this does not mean that they all would say it together in a rhythmic way.
Reviving sunan that have been forgotten or forsaken brings about a great deal of reward. We all know the statement of the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam),
“Whoever revives one of my Sunnahs that has died out after I am gone will have a reward like that of everyone who does it without that detracting from their reward in the slightest.”[6]

Q4: Should we fast all ten days?
Fasting is one of the most virtuous deeds. Abu Hurairah narrated that the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said that Allah says,
“Every action of the son of Adam is given manifold reward; each good deed receiving ten times its like, up to seven hundred times. Allah the Most High said: ‘Except for fasting, for it is for Me and I will give recompense for it, he leaves off his desires and his food for Me’. For the fasting person there are two times of joy; a time of joy when he breaks his fast and a time of joy when he meets his Lord, and the smell coming from the mouth of the fasting person is better with Allah than the smell of Musk.”[7]

Abdullah ibn Amr reported that the Messenger of Allah (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said,
“The fast and the Qur’an are two intercessors for the servant of Allah on the Day of Resurrection. The fast will say: ‘O Lord, I prevented him from his food and desires during the day. Let me intercede for him.’ The Qur’an will say: ‘I prevented him from sleeping at night. Let me intercede for him.’ And their intercession will be accepted.”[8]

It is narrated from Hunaydah ibn Khaalid from his wife, that one of the wives of the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said,
“The Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) used to fast on the first nine days of Dhu’l-Hijjah and the day of ‘Ashoora’, the three days each month, the first Monday of the month and two Thursdays.”[9]

In another narration reported by al-Nasaaʽi, Hafsah, the wife of the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) said, “the Prophet never left four things; fasting Ashura, the first ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah, three days every month and the two rak’ats before the Fajr prayer.”
However, these two narrations are not clear cut evidences that the Prophet used to fast the first nine days of Dhu’l-Hijjah every year for two main reasons. Firstly, some scholars disputed the authenticity of them. Secondly, these reports were contradicted by another report in Sahih Muslim that Aisha, the wife of the Prophet confirmed that she never saw the Prophet fasting the ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah. The scholars have different ways of reconciling between these contradictory reports and it was concluded by the vast majority of scholars that fasting them is a much recommended act as it combines between fasting which is a very virtuous act during a very blessed time.

Q5: Have these days been mentioned in the Quran?
Yes they are mentioned in the Qur’an. Allah says,
“That they may witness things that are of benefit to them (i.e. reward of Hajj in the Hereafter, and also some worldly gain from trade), and mention the Name of Allah on appointed days, over the beast of cattle that He has provided for them (for sacrifice).”[10]

The majority are of the view that the “appointed days” are the first ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah as narrated from Ibn ‘Abbas (raḍiy Allāhu ʿanhu). Moreover, Allah swears by them – “By the dawn, by the ten nights.”[11]  Ibn ‘Abbas, Ibn al-Zubayr, Mujahid and others from among the earlier and later generations said that this refers to the ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah with Ibn Kathir positing that this is the correct view.

Q6: What is the best format of takbeer and when?

One version of takbeer, according to some of the early generation scholars, is as follows:
“Allah akbar, Allahu akbar, laa ilaaha ill-Allah, Allahu akbar, wa Lillaah il-hamd”

(Allah is Most Great, Allah is Most Great, there is no God but Allah; Allah is Most Great and to Allah be praise).
Takbeer is of two types during these days – one general and the other specific and restricted.

With regards to the general takbeer, it is prescribed from the beginning of the month, which starts by the sunset of the last day of month Dhu’l Qa’dah – the month preceding Dhu’l-Hijjah, until the sunset of the 13th day of Dhu’l-Hijjah.
Allah says, “That they may witness things that are of benefit to them (i.e. reward of Hajj in the Hereafter, and also some worldly gain from trade), and mention the Name of Allah on known appointed days.”[12] The known appointed days are the first ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah according to the scholars of tafsir. Moreover, Allah says, “And remember Allah during the few appointed Days.”[13] The few appointed days are the 11th, 12th and 13th days of the month of Dhul-Hijjah.”
The Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) also said, “The days of Tashreeq are the days of eating, drinking and remembering Allah.”[14] It was reported that Umar ibn al-Khattaab and his son Abdullah (raḍiy Allāhu ʿanhuma) used to declare Takbeer during the days of Mina in the mosque and in the camps, and they would raise their voices until Mina echoed with their Takbeer.

Q7: What about the Restricted Takbeer?
Restricted takbeer is the same form of takbeer but it is to be said specifically after the five compulsory prayers, especially if they are performed in congregation. It also can be said either after finishing the prayer or after that normal dhikr that ought to be recited after the prayer. It starts for those who are not doing Hajj either after Fajr or Dhuhr on the day of Arafah. For people doing Hajj it starts after Dhuhr of the tenth day. In both cases it continues until the Asr prayer on the 13th day of Dhu’l-Hijjah which is the last day of tashreeq. This range is what the vast majority of Companions agreed to. Women may engage in this act if they pray in quarters separate from non-mahram men.
Thus according to the most correct scholarly view, unrestricted takbeer and takbeer restricted to certain times are combined on five days – the Day of ‘Arafah, the Day of Sacrifice, and the three days of Tashreeq.

Q8: Which calendar should we follow for the announcement of Dhu’l-Hijjah?

Generally speaking, the local calendar is the one that should be followed by local people provided that most Muslims in that country accept it even if it differs from Makkah. The basis of this is the hadith of the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam),
“The fast is the day you all fast; the breaking of the fast is on the day that you all break the fast; and the day of sacrifice is on the day that you all sacrifice.” al-Tirmidhi, having narrated the hadith said, “Some scholars explained this hadith to mean that fasting and breaking the fast should be done with the Muslim body [jama’ah] or the majority of people.”

Q9: What can we do if we could not identify the first day of Dhu’l-Hijjah as it is normally announced late?

The person should put himself on the safe side and hence on the 29th of Dhu’l Qa’dah, which is the lunar month just before Dhu’l-Hijjah, the person should prepare himself assuming that the next day is the first day of Dhu’l-Hijjah. For example, he should cut his hair, nails, moustache and pubic hair if he is planning to sacrifice an animal. In Sahih Muslim, Umm Salamah, the wife of the Prophet peace be upon him, narrated that the Prophet said, “When the month of Dhu’l-Hijjah starts, if one of you wants to offer a sacrifice, let him refrain from (cutting) his hair and nails.”
According to another version of the hadith, “When the ten days (of Dhu’l-Hijjah) begin, if one of you wants to offer a sacrifice, let him not touch his hair or skin with anything.”

The person should also start fasting and increasing in good deeds. If it is confirmed that this was the first day then the goal was achieved, and if not this worship will not harm him in any way.

Q10: Do you recommend that we take off work and study for the duration of the 10 days in order to increase our deeds?

People take holidays to travel and enjoy worldly benefits. Why do they not take vacations to enjoy eternal benefits that they will get in their eternal life? Some people make more use of their time in worship if they are off work. Others find it extremely difficult to fast on the job. For such people, they should seriously consider taking leave.

Q11: Is it true that the person should abstain from sexual relations (with one’s spouse) during these ten days?

This is not true. However, if a person is fasting, he should abstain from sexual activities due to fasting and not due to the first ten days of Dhu’l-Hijjah.

 

 

Notes: 
Sources: www.islam21c.com 
Islam21c requests all the readers of this article, and others, to share it on your facebooktwitter, and other platforms to further spread our efforts.

[1]
 al-Bukhari

[2] Ahmad

[3] Zaad al-Ma’aad (1/54)

[4] al-Bukhaari

[5] Ahmad

[6] al-Tirmidhi

[7] al-Bukhari and Muslim

[8] Ahmad

[9] al-Nasaa’I and Abu Dawood

[10] al-Hajj 22:28

[11] al-Fajr 89:1

[12] al-Hajj 22:28

[13] al-Baqarah 2:203

[14] Muslim

 

 

About Shaikh (Dr) Haitham Al-Haddad

Dr. Haitham al-Haddad is a jurist and serves as a judge for the Islamic Council of Europe. He has studied the Islamic sciences for over 20 years under the tutelage of renowned scholars such as the late Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia as well as the retired Head of the Kingdom's Higher Judiciary Council. He specialises in many of the Islamic sciences and submitted his doctoral thesis on Islamic jurisprudence concerning Muslim minorities. Shaikh Haitham is highly respected having specialised knowledge in the field of fiqh, usul al-fiqh, maqasid al-shari'ah, ulum al-Qur’an, tafsir, aqidah, and fiqh al-hadith. He provides complex theories which address the role of Islamic jurisprudence within a western environment whilst also critically re-analysing the approach of Islamic jurists in forming legal rulings (ifta’) within a western socio-political context. He has many well known students most of whom are active in dawah and teaching in the West. The shaikh is an Islamic jurist (faqih) and as such is qualified to deliver verdicts as a judge under Islamic law, a role he undertakes at the Islamic Council of Europe as Islamic judge and treasurer. Dr Haitham al-Haddad also sits on various the boards of advisors for Islamic organisations, mainly in the United Kingdom but also around the world.

16 comments

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  2. Mohammed Iqbal

    Is it sunnah that on day of Eid-ul-adha you should not eat until after eid salaat?
    Assalaamualaikum

    Can one of our shaikhs tell us about the below;

    I am told that on the morning of Eid Ul Adha it is a sunnah not to eat until after eid salaat.

    Is it true? authentic etc?????

    Wassalaamualaikum

    Muhammed Iqbal

    • Brother Shameel

      Praise be to Allaah.

      The Sunnahs that the Muslim should observe on the day of Eid are as follows:

      1 – Doing ghusl before going out to the prayer.

      It was narrated in a saheeh hadeeth in al-Muwatta’ and elsewhere that ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Umar used to do ghusl on the day of al-Fitr before going out to the prayer-place in the morning. Al-Muwatta’ 428.

      Al- Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said that the Muslims were unanimously agreed that it is mustahabb to do ghusl for Eid prayer.

      The reason why it is mustahabb is the same reason as that for doing ghusl before Jumu’ah and other public gatherings. Rather on Eid the reason is even stronger.

      2 – Eating before going out to pray on Eid al-Fitr and after the prayer on Eid al-Adha:

      Part of the etiquette is not to go out to pray on Eid al-Fitr until one has eaten some dates, because of the hadeeth narrated by al-Bukhaari from Anas ibn Maalik, who said that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used not to go out on the morning of Eid al-Fitr until he had eaten some dates… of which he would eat an odd number. Al-Bukhaari, 953.

      It is mustahabb to eat before going out to emphasize the fact that it is forbidden to fast on that day and to demonstrate that the fast has ended.

      Ibn Hajar (may Allaah have mercy on him) suggested that the reason for that was so as to ward off the possibility of adding to the fast, and to hasten to obey the command of Allaah. Al-Fath, 2/446

      Whoever does not have any dates may break his fast with anything that is permissible.

      But on Eid al-Adha it is mustahabb not to eat anything until one comes back from the prayer, so he should eat from the udhiyah if he has offered a sacrifice. If he is not going to offer a sacrifice there is nothing wrong with eating before the prayer.

      3 – Takbeer on the day of Eid

      This is one of the greatest Sunnahs on the day of Eid because Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

      “(He wants that you) must complete the same number (of days), and that you must magnify Allaah [i.e. to say Takbeer (Allaahu Akbar: Allaah is the Most Great)] for having guided you so that you may be grateful to Him”

      [al-Baqarah 2:185]

      It was narrated that al-Waleed ibn Muslim said: I asked al-Awzaa’i and Maalik ibn Anas about saying Takbeer out loud on the two Eids. They said, Yes, ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Umar used to say it out loud on the day of al-Fitr until the imam came out (to lead the prayers).

      It was narrated in a saheeh report that ‘Abd al-Rahmaan al-Sulami said, “They emphasized it more on the day of al-Fitr than the day of al-Adha.”. Wakee’ said, this refers to the takbeer. See Irwa’ al-Ghaleel, 3/122/

      Al-Daaraqutni and others narrated that on the morning of Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha, Ibn ‘Umar would strive hard in reciting takbeer until he came to the prayer place, then he would recite takbeer until the imam came out.

      Ibn Abi Shaybah narrated with a saheeh isnaad that al-Zuhri said: The people used to recite Takbeer on Eid when they came out of their houses until they came to the prayer place, and until the imam came out. When the imam came out they fell silent, and when he said takbeer they said takbeer. See Irwa’ al-Ghaleel, 1/121

      Saying takbeer when coming out of one’s house to the prayer place and until the imam came out was something that was well known among the salaf (early generations). This has been narrated by a number of scholars such as Ibn Abi Shaybah, ‘Abd a l-Razzaaq and al-Firyaabi in Ahkaam al-Eidayn from a group of the salaf. For example, Naafi’ ibn Jubayr used to recite takbeer and was astonished that the people did not do so, and he said, “Why do you not recite takbeer?”

      Ibn Shihaab al-Zuhri (may Allaah have mercy on him) used to say, “The people used to recite takbeer from the time they came out of their houses until the imam came in.”

      The time for takbeer on Eid al-Fitr starts from the night before Eid until the imam enters to lead the Eid prayer.

      In the case of Eid al-Adha, the takbeer begins on the first day of Dhu’l-Hijjah and lasts until sunset on the last of the days of tashreeq.

      Description of the takbeer:

      It was narrated in the Musannaf of Ibn Abi Shaybah with a saheeh isnaad from Ibn Mas’ood (may Allaah be pleased with him) that he used to recite takbeer during the days of tashreeq:

      Allaahu akbar, Allaahu akbar, laa ilaaha ill-Allaah, wa Allaahu akbar, Allaah akbar, wa Lillaah il-hamd (Allaah is Most Great, Allaah is most Great, there is no god but Allaah, Allaah is Most great, Allaah is most great, and to Allaah be praise).

      It was also narrated elsewhere by Ibn Abi Shaybah with the same isnaad, but with the phrase “Allaahu akbar” repeated three times.

      Al-Mahaamili narrated with a saheeh isnaad also from Ibn Mas’ood: “Allaahu akbaru kabeera, Allaahu akbaru kabeera, Allaahu akbar wa ajallu, Allaahu akbar wa Lillaah il-hamd (Allaah is Most Great indeed, Allaah is Most Great indeed, Allaah is most Great and Glorified, Allaah is Most Great and to Allaah be praise).” See al-Irwa’, 3/126.

      4 – Offering congratulations

      The etiquette of Eid also includes the congratulations and good wishes exchanged by people, no matter what the wording, such as saying to one another Taqabbala Allaah minna wa minkum (May Allaah accept (good deeds) from us and from you” or “Eid mubaarak” and other permissible expressions of congratulations.

      It was narrated that Jubayr ibn Nufayr said: When the companions of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) met one another on the day of Eid, they would say to one another, “May Allaah accept (good deeds) from us and from you.” Ibn Hajar said, its isnaad is hasan. Al-Fath, 2/446.

      Offering congratulations was something that was well known among the Sahaabah, and scholars such as Imam Ahmad and others allowed it. There is evidence which suggests that it is prescribed to offer congratulations and good wishes on special occasions, and that the Sahaabah congratulated one another when good things happened, such as when Allaah accepted the repentance of a man, they went and congratulated him for that, and so on.

      Undoubtedly these congratulations are among the noble characteristics among the Muslims.

      The least that may be said concerning the subject of congratulations is that you should return the greetings of those who congratulate you on Eid, and keep quiet if others keep quiet, as Imam Ahmad (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: If anyone congratulates you, then respond, otherwise do not initiate it.

      5 – Adorning oneself on the occasion of Eid.

      It was narrated that ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) said that ‘Umar took a brocade cloak that was for sale in the market and brought it to the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), and said, “O Messenger of Allaah, buy this and adorn yourself with it for Eid and for receiving the delegations.” The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said to him, “Rather this is the dress of one who has no share (of piety or of reward in the Hereafter)…” Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 948.

      The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) agreed with ‘Umar on the idea of adorning oneself for Eid, but he denounced him for choosing this cloak because it was made of silk.

      It was narrated that Jaabir (may Allaah be pleased with him) said: The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) had a cloak which he would wear on the two Eids and on Fridays. Saheeh Ibn Khuzaymah, 1756,

      Al-Bayhaqi narrated with a saheeh isnaad that Ibn ‘Umar used to wear his best clothes on Eid.

      So a man should wear the best clothes that he has when going out for Eid.

      With regard to women, they should avoid adorning themselves when they go out for Eid, because they are forbidden to show off their adornments to non-mahram men. It is also haraam for a woman who wants to go out to put on perfume or to expose men to temptation, because they are only going out for the purpose of worship.

      6 – Going to the prayer by one route and returning by another.

      It was narrated that Jaabir ibn ‘Abd-Allaah (may Allaah be pleased with him) said: On the day of Eid, the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to vary his route. Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 986.

      It was said that the reason for that was so that the two routes would testify for him on the Day of Resurrection, for the earth will speak on the Day of Resurrection and say what was done on it, both good and bad.

      And it was said that it was in order to manifest the symbols of Islam on both routes, or to manifest the remembrance of Allaah (dhikr), or to annoy the hypocrites and Jews, and to scare them with the large number of people who were with him. And it was said that it was in order to attend to the people’s needs, to answer their questions, teach them, set an example and give charity to the needy, or to visit his relatives and uphold the ties of kinship.

      And Allaah knows best. (source Islam Q and A ) BY SALIH AL MUNAJJID

  3. Jigar Ali Khwaja

    Sacrifice of Animals in European Contries & Britain
    As European Contries & Britain do not allow anybody to sacrifice animals by their own so how Muslims can perform sacrifice on the day of Eid ul Adha. or is there any alternate way to perform it. can we pay equivalent amount for such animal to some poor family or flood / Earth quake victim somewhere in the world instead of sacrificing an animal on the day of Eid.

  4. Mashaallah!
    Assalaamualayakum

    Jazakallahukhairan katheeran

    This is beautiful and beneficial.

  5. Re abrahamic father re yusuf
    AF, you come across quite arrogant and patronizing. Yusuf was stating his knowledge and appeared humble in the sense he was clearly stating it’s according to his knowledge and he could be wrong. But as per your conclusion (and approval!) on “it’s correct” and we should only speak when we are 100% and are a person of knowledge. So what are you sayin? You are 100% correct AND u r a person of knowledge are you?? Cos that’s what ur actually sayin mate. Your reprimand was unneccersary in my opinion. And Yusufs further jzkallah/thank you (despite what you wrote) was the nail on the coffin for me. I had to speak now. Mashallah, yusuf seems a nice guy saying what he knows. The point is AF you COULD (can be, have n no doubt will be at some time in ur life) be wrong and if you are a person of knowledge you missed a few lessons on appreciating context, being polite and not coming across an arrogant carrier of Islamic knowledge. And chucking in some duas and nice “inshallah’s, jzkallah’s”. Doesnt make WHAT you saying any less egotistical or patronizing. People like you shove their “holy” knowledge down ppl’s thoughts and think they r Lil khalifah’s on the earth. And just cos u r talking about islam. AND may even be right (in terms of of factual detail/Fiqh). DOESN’T make you right. Cos ur really not. I mean y write a comment and lay into a guy just to then agree no give ue scholarly “validation”??? U really didn’t add anything to our lives or the discussion. Yusuf had actually answered it all along. People like u make other decent nice soft Muslims life’s hell. Like glorified egotistical foghorn who bellow with Quran and Hadith. Use all d bukhari you want doesn’t make you a nice guy or non arrogant. U can be perfectly arrogant, egotistical and think too much of urself and ur opinion – and not say other than the word of Quran, Hadith or Fiqh.

    Check yerself, b4 ya wreck yaself mate. plz note this is clear cut no holds barred in yer face opaque advice mate. Its bordering injustice how u wrote. Cos people who talk like you do – especially about islam get on my tether. A good question to ask yourself at night would be – who do I think I am??? Cos u seem to think u r a khalifah, scholar, mujahideen and mujjadid in one. Against some nice bro speaking the Haq. Cos u think u r oh so learned. And yet the fruits from the tree of ilm evade u!

    And if you think this is a bit too much and lacking adaab – that’s exactly how you came across.

    May Allah guide us all – including u and me AF – tonthe truth, a sound heart and not being a meanie.

  6. Re abrahamic father re yusuf
    AF, you come across quite arrogant and patronizing. Yusuf was stating his knowledge and appeared humble in the sense he was clearly stating it’s according to his knowledge and he could be wrong. But as per your conclusion (and approval!) on “it’s correct” and we should only speak when we are 100% and are a person of knowledge. So what are you sayin? You are 100% correct AND u r a person of knowledge are you?? Cos that’s what ur actually sayin mate. Your reprimand was unneccersary in my opinion. And Yusufs further jzkallah/thank you (despite what you wrote) was the nail on the coffin for me. I had to speak now. Mashallah, yusuf seems a nice guy saying what he knows. The point is AF you COULD (can be, have n no doubt will be at some time in ur life) be wrong and if you are a person of knowledge you missed a few lessons on appreciating context, being polite and not coming across an arrogant carrier of Islamic knowledge. And chucking in some duas and nice “inshallah’s, jzkallah’s”. Doesnt make WHAT you saying any less egotistical or patronizing. People like you shove their “holy” knowledge down ppl’s thoughts and think they r Lil khalifah’s on the earth. And just cos u r talking about islam. AND may even be right (in terms of of factual detail/Fiqh). DOESN’T make you right. Cos ur really not. I mean y write a comment and lay into a guy just to then agree no give ue scholarly “validation”??? U really didn’t add anything to our lives or the discussion. Yusuf had actually answered it all along. People like u make other decent nice soft Muslims life’s hell. Like glorified egotistical foghorn who bellow with Quran and Hadith. Use all d bukhari you want doesn’t make you a nice guy or non arrogant. U can be perfectly arrogant, egotistical and think too much of urself and ur opinion – and not say other than the word of Quran, Hadith or Fiqh.

    Check yerself, b4 ya wreck yaself mate. plz note this is clear cut no holds barred in yer face opaque advice mate. Its bordering injustice how u wrote. Cos people who talk like you do – especially about islam get on my tether. A good question to ask yourself at night would be – who do I think I am??? Cos u seem to think u r a khalifah, scholar, mujahideen and mujjadid in one. Against some nice bro speaking the Haq. Cos u think u r oh so learned. And yet the fruits from the tree of ilm evade u!

    And if you think this is a bit too much and lacking adaab – that’s exactly how you came across.

    May Allah guide us all – including u and me AF – tonthe truth, a sound heart and not being a meanie.

  7. Yusuf Abdel-Rahman

    Jazakullahu khair brother for your information and advice. 😀

  8. Please could you clarify what a woman should do if her parents offer a sacrifice on her behalf. Is it correct that the prohibition therefore does not apply to her?

    Is it better for her to offer a sacrifice in her own right if she has the money to do so?

    At what point can she remove her hair/nails – after ‘Eid salah or is it after the sacrifice has been performed (if it has been performed in another country) – and given many countries will do Eid on different days then does it mean she has to wait until she is certain the sacrifice has been performed, even if that is 2 days after Eid is celebrated in her own country?

  9. The Abrahamic Father

    @Yusuf Abdel-Rahman
    Akhi, may Allah increase you in good deeds and knowledge.

    I understand your striving to help another Muslim with a question and may Allah reward you for your sincerity, but one should really keep the habit of refraining from offering (Islamic) legal advice unless one is either 100% sure or a person of knowledge.

    Think about it, if a person does something wrong ignorantly but with good intentions they will be rewarded, however if you give them incorrect knowledge knowing you may be wrong that you fall into sin. Thus it is better to let a person err and be rewarded than to sin yourself.

    In regards to the issue, you were correct, may Allah increase you.

  10. Yusuf Abdel-Rahman

    @Abdullah Husain
    Salam Alaikum brotherm
    According to my knowledge, one should absatin from the cutting of finger nails or hair if he plans on making the sacrifice of the animal. If one does not intend to sacrifice, then as i know he does not have to abstain from cutting fingernails or hair. Allaho A’lam. (I may be wrong, just according to my knowledge)

  11. 10 days sacrifice
    This is a good questions and answer forum. It has added to my knowledge.

  12. Abdullah Hussain

    Hair and nails
    Asalaamu alaikum.

    I hope you are well insha’Allah. JazakAllahu Khaira for this information. I have heard that the cutting of hair and nails are prohibited during these 10 days. Is this true?

    WS. :'(

  13. Abdullah Hussain

    Cutting of hair and nails
    Assalaamu alaikum.

    JazakAllahu Khaira for this information. I have heard that the cutting of hair and nails during these 10 days is prohibited. Is that true?

    WS.

  14. jazakallahu khairen…for ur information is truly benefiting one…may allah(swt)guide us all on de rite path and may he bless us to acheive the full benefits of these days….

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